Home » Posts tagged 'coleaders'

Tag Archives: coleaders

Who creates the vision?

In Learning to Lead, leadership guru Warren Bennis claimed there are four competencies of leadership.

  1. Mastering the context.
  2. Knowing yourself.
  3. Creating a powerful vision.
  4. Communicating with meaning.

Although all four of these competencies have a different flavor for CoLeaders than traditional leaders, the one that I find most challenging is creating a powerful vision. This assumes a top-down approach to leadership and followership. I sense that one element of the crisis of leadership and followership is this self-centered approach.

The culture is changing.

Take President Obama for example. In 2008 masses of young people rallied to support his candidacy in part because of his message, “Change we can believe in.” His book, The Audacity of Hope, also inspired people. Obama’s vision was broad and bold. His followers wanted to hope that things would change. But did they?

I try not to criticize any singular human being, especially someone serving as The President of the United States. President Obama made promises that the political system did not allow him to keep. He has been transformed by the personal responsibility he has borne as President.

However, has Obama really changed much of anything in our culture? Yes, the economy has recovered (in some ways). The rich got richer. The bankers benefitted the most. Democracy is even more threatened than it was before 2008. Voting rights are more restrictive. Women’s’ reproductive freedoms have lost ground in many parts of our country. Racism is more visible.

What happened to the millions of young people who joined the Obama for President movement? Did some of them end up joining the occupy Wall Street movement? Will they vote for the next Democrat candidate?

Will they vote for Hillary Clinton?  Personally, I doubt it. They may not vote at all.

In the past eight years a growing minority of our culture has become increasingly cynical about leaders, politics, and institutions. How do we shift this cynicism into activism?

In the past, I have been the leader effectively casting a vision for others to follow. I learned valuable lessons. If I have positional power and cast a vision, even if people follow that vision, it is only effective as long as I succeed as the leader. As someone who disrupts and undermines hierarchies, I cannot count on maintaining positional authority. Those who have power over me replace me because I threaten the hierarchy. The next person in the position does not sustain my vision – they cast their own vision.

I am certain other leaders will continue to cast their own vision and expect others to follow. This style of leadership may continue to dominate our culture for the remainder of my lifetime.  I hope this is not the case.

I recommend that people with an interest in transforming organizations or systems read, The Three Laws of Performance. Although the book focuses primarily on transforming organizations and contexts, it is also an excellent book for people interested in collaborative leadership.

The Three Laws of Performance also has three leadership corollaries. One is particularly pertinent to a conversation about vision. “Leaders listen for the future of their organization.” This flips the conventional wisdom about leadership and vision upside down. Leaders don’t cast the vision. Leaders don’t create the future of their organization. Leaders listen.

What conventional wisdom teaches – leaders must create and then cast the vision – is outdated and ineffective.

What if the world really needs a good listening to? What if people inside any organization have a great deal to contribute to the future of the organization? What if collective leadership is the best way to deal with a complex, volatile, and uncertain world?

CoLeaders listen for the future. We believe that the future can be better than the present. Yet, CoLeaders are not so arrogant that they think their vision is the only answer to the needs of the world (or even our family, workplace, or community needs).

We are each just one piece in a giant puzzle that can create a more beautiful, just, compassionate, peaceful, and sustainable world. I am just one piece. I do not have the complete picture.

Our CoLeader Connection is a place where we can bring our small pieces of the global vision together. Together we will listen for a more beautiful and compassionate future.

Feel free to share your piece of the vision in the comments.

 

 

 

Questions for rebel leaders?

As my social and environmental consciousness has deepened, I have become more of a rebel. Rebels feel at home in movements dedicated to cultural transformation. I am not alone in my progression from “liberal strategist” to rebel catalyst. In my studies of the evolution of leadership, I understand it is the evolutionary path.

I have always struggled with leadership; which is probably why I have spent so much time and money learning everything that I can about leading and leadership. From as far back as my high school days, I have also had a desire to teach and develop other leaders. Because the culture of leadership is going through a paradigm shift, my ideas about leading and developing leaders have evolved. Now, I find myself at the fringe of the huge multi-billion dollar industry[i] developing a new social enterprise to support an emerging style of leadership.

As an alchemist and rebel, I have journeyed through the various transformations of leadership (Torbert) and I understand the process, what worked, and what did not work. I have developed a deep curiosity and commitment to being a part of a community of practice with others who share my commitment to cultural transformation.

One question that truly engages my imagination is this:

Given the failures of leadership and the masses of people who are rebelling against authoritarian leaders, how do we reclaim the language of leading and transform the culture of leading?

I have experienced leadership development training programs within several systems or sectors: financial services, corporate, community development, nonprofit, religious leadership, and nonviolence movements. My Master of Divinity degree focused on spiritual leadership. My current Master of Transformative Leadership is the most progressive leadership education program I have experienced, and still I find myself on the fringe. Yes, I am a rebel, even among those who are passionate about leadership development.

Another question I wrestle with is how do we nurture and support rebel leaders? I believe the inquiry and exploration of this paradox is important to a number of movements involved in saving the earth and creating a world that works for everyone (all creatures).

There are a number of pilot projects and studies exploring aspects of this question. A handful of progressive foundations are funding studies of coleadership, collective leading, shared leading, and distributed leadership. A 2002 report to the Annie Casey Foundation[ii], reported that leaders of social change nonprofits and programs disdain advanced degrees and believe existing management and leadership programs are irrelevant to their type of work. They are interested in applied learning and new organizational structures that will support their social change work.[iii]

The Create, Initiate, Engage: Our CoLeader Connection is a brand new (still in the formation stage) community of practice for rebel leaders. https://follr.com/Communities/OurCoLeaderConnection

One of our biggest challenges is overcoming preconceived ideas related to the language: leading, leaders, and leadership. Rebels are rising up against authoritarian leaders in all sectors of our global culture. The words (leading, leader, leadership) are incendiary for many rebels. Our words (more specifically the meaning we assign to words) create our worldview.

The distinction “CoLeader” is essential. Our CoLeader connection is not about an individual process of developing the capacity to exercise power over others. There is an abundance of conventional leadership programs that continue to try to shape leaders for a style of leadership that no longer works (see previous blog posts about the failure of leadership and followership).

My question for readers is this: How do we reclaim the language of leading in ways that creates a culture where everyone leads? Do we need new words? If so, please share the language that works for you.

________________________________________________

 

 

[i] According to January 2014 report by McKinsey & Company, U.S. Companies alone spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development. http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/leading_in_the_21st_century/why_leadership-development_programs_fail?p=1

[ii] Frances Kunreuther. Generational Changes and Leadership: Implications For Social Change Organizations http://leadershiplearning.org/system/files/Generational+Changes+and+Leadership-Full+Report_0.pdf

[iii] This is the work that Create, Initiate, and Engage is doing with social movement programs and organizations. We use leading edge (fringe) strategies and frameworks designed to release and support shared power and cultural transformation.